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Alaska
What a wonderful place.
I spent two tours there:
One at King Salmon, as MSgt in the Air Force.
The second one at Cape Lisburne, as a Civilian working for RCA.

This site is my days there, in pictures.
Hope you enjoy this site, comments welcomed, Email at the bottom

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Alaska Facts:  http://www.alaskasbest.com/facts.htm
Alaska, North to Alaska:  http://www.50states.com/alaska.htm

Alaska of course has bears, several types.
The Brown bear or Grizzley bear is mostly in the Southern part of Alaslka.
The Polar bear resides mostly in the Northern part of Alaska

Brown bear
Diet: Omnivore
Average lifespan in the wild: 25 years
Size: 5 to 8 ft
Weight: 700 lbs
Speed: 40 MPH

Size relative to a 6-ft man:
browmb1.gif

Polar bear
Diet: Carnivore
Average lifespan in the wild: 25 to 30 years
Size: 7.25 to 8 ft
Weight: 900 to 1,600 lbs
Speed: 25 MPH


Size relative to a 6-ft man:
polarb1.gif

The aveage human can run around 9 - 15 MPH
So don't try to out run any bear, stay clear.
That was preached to us so often, in briefings.


Cape Lisburne, Alaska
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How does one get to Cape Lisburne, Alaska?
Or once at Cape Lisburne, how to go to "Top Camp"?

The Trip

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Cape 1.jpg

Cape 2.jpg

Cape Lisburne, or the Cape as it is called.  The Cape was manned by active duty Air Force personnal.  
Then the AF decided to contract it out to a civilian company.
RCA won the mainteanance contract and the manning was reduced a great deal.
Top camp had 8 to 12 active duty there, once RCA took over it was reduced to 2 people.
Those two people assumed all the duties that was once divided among the 8 or 12 active duty people.

All the items that the AF had remained, as it was cheaper to leave all, rather the the expense of removing.
Pool table, movie projector, all the stoves, ovens, freezers, washers, dryers, everything remained.

When I got there in 1980, the one person that was there (Greg), did not cook so he had lived on sandwiches.
One of the first things I did was contact bottom camp to have some food sent up.
From then on, we ate well.
Greg decided to call it quits, and another took his place, Ray Brown, from Alabama.

Ray was a excellent cook, so between us, one cooked, the other one cleaned.  We swapped every other day.
Before the two of us got there, supplies were sent up from bottom camp every two weeks, depending on the road.

But with just the two of us, it got loney, so Ray and I came up with a plan.  One Sunday we invited ever how many that wanted to come up from bottom camp, for Sunday dinner was invited.
That went over so well, we decided to host Sunday dinner every two weeks.
That was a moral boost for both us and the ones at bottom camp.  They had a change of scenery and we had company.

Point is, The Cape and especially, Top Camp is and was a lonely, isolated place, we made the best of it.

A few of the pictures taken with a Polaroid SX 70 camera (no zoom lens).
When I was stupid and walked around the outside alone, unarmed.

To prove how dumb I really was, note how far I am from safety, if a bear?
When I went back to show the photos to Ray Brown, he wanted ones too.  So off I go again.
At the first place, I noticed paw prints or something that was not there before?
Moving on to the next place, I noticed those foot prints as I walked along?
Smartness sit in finally, I high tailed it back to safety.

The supply folks arrived and we went to view those "prints".

"Polar bear tracks", the old timers all said.  I never ventured out again, until I left to come home. 
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If you notice that "line" extending from that shed looking building down to the bottom of that mountain.
It was for a tram/cable car, used to transport supplies and humans back and forth,
ended at the very far end of the runway,
a vehicle would provide the rest of the ride to bottom camp.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
It was no longer in use in my days there.

cape-kit1.jpg     cape-kit2.jpg
Remember this kitchen once held 8 - 12 military folks, now its for only two civilian folks.
We had already moved a couple tables and chairs out of the way.
Note the appliances, stoves, ranges, frig, freezers.

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Ray Brown from Alabama
Great cook and electronics technician.

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The transportation drivers.
"Pop", "Louie". "Foot"

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My room, with private shower and toilet.
The two photo's are opposite each other, I could lay in bed, listen to radio, talk on the phone to the States,
and enjoy the wall in front of me.

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Hey, look at me, no more 35-10 for me, I am retired, let my hair grow as long as I like!
Mustache even, with the edges going down my chin,,,,,whoa!!
Did not last ong though, hated it.  


 King Salmon, Alaska
1973 - 1974
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 Cape Lisburne, Alaska
1980 - 1981
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To email, click the Colonel

Edward McDowell Duvall
"A Kentucky Colonel"
Retired MSGT USAF
Member SAR, Panama City, Florida


To view a index of all the sites I have designed
Click on the link
http://eddyduvall.com/index.html

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Site background courtesy:  http://www.katmaibears.com/
Background photo, Bear photo, permission granted from: Dr. Lynn L. Rogers  http://www.bearstudy.org/
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The moving water applet (lake.class) courtesy of David Griffiths:
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David Griffiths has shut down his web site, and can no longer be contacted: